El Economista – What do companies seek in their legal service provider?

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DATE: 23-09-19

CORRALROSALES IN THE NEWS: 

-Rafael Rosales

MEDIA: El Economista

Our Partner Rafael Rosales published a detailed article in the Spanish specialized medium El Economista, in which he analyzes the characteristics and needs of companies when they seek a legal service provider. The development of technological tools has led to everything going faster, and therefore, decision making by executives must be at full speed. Moreover, the advice should provide that speed.

“Far is the time when the responses of the offices to the inquiries of their clients were broad legal disquisitions. Executives have no interest in knowing the legal texts and the respective doctrine, nor the time to review extensive documents. Therefore, concise and easy-to-read reports and responses, without excessive citations from authors and jurisprudence, are highly valued,” says Rosales in his article.

One of the key points highlighted by our Partner is the communication between the two parties. Companies expect a constant flow of communication with their legal advice, and in addition to that, they must be proactive. “It is very important to participate in the development of the client’s business and even help in the execution and generation of new projects, in short, to be an active part of the company,” he adds in the article.

Rosales also points to billing as one of the factors to consider. Legal advice is not exempt from the tight budgets that companies manage and therefore, they must have an added value to offer their clients. “Beyond the high quality of the advice and the recognition of the client, receiving an unexpected invoice will cause discomfort in the consultant, who may even find other alternatives for later occasions,” says our Partner Rafael Rosales.

If you want to read the full article, click here

Delayed or Canceled Flight? What the passenger does not know

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Your luggage was checked, you boarding pass is at hand, you pass through the security filters, waiting for the call to board, and suddenly, you look at the information panel in the waiting room and see the message nobody likes to get: “delayed or canceled flight”.

Although the passenger does not know the causes of flight delays and cancellations and everything is in apparent normality at the airport, the operation of a flight implies the existence of several factors that must be perfectly aligned.

The following are the most common causes of flight delay or cancellation.

1.- Weather conditions

Heavy rains and snowfall during the winter months are well known; these can delay ground operations and hinder landing or take off maneuvers. The sunny summer arrives and the season of greatest passenger traffic begins: family vacations, meetings with friends, sunny days to enjoy, and a climate that would seem pleasant to fly. However, the combination of high temperatures and summer winds can surprisingly result in a storm that may result imperceptible at ground level.

During the summer months, the hot air rises and interacts with the cold air that is in the upper atmosphere. This mixture causes water vapor to condense and storm clouds with lightning to form at great heights; the lighting cannot be seen from the surface.

In general, airlines coordinate with Air Traffic Control if a change in landing or take-off routes is needed to avoid these thunderstorm clouds. But the operation could continue to represent a risk for ground workers who are on the platform carrying out activities prior to the departure or arrival of flights, such as aircraft fueling, luggage transfer, inspection and cleaning of aircrafts, etc.

Then, due to weather changes, delays or cancellations of scheduled itineraries occur. In these cases, the airline is exempt from the obligation to compensate passengers for the damages that they could have suffered as established in the regulations of “Provisions for Compensation to Users for Flight Delays”, because the facts are not attributable to the company.

2.- Operational modifications

For the optimization of operations and greater efficiency in fuel consumption, an aircraft may be scheduled to fly to several destinations. In this case, a delay in another station could cause what is called “drag delay”; that is, a problem in another airport could result in a delay in the operation of the next flight in some other point.

Likewise, there are operating conditions that must be met to ensure flight safety, such as checking that the crew has complied with the mandatory rest time stated in the aviation technical regulations or ensuring that the members responsible for the flight operation are fit to embark. It is uncommon, but there have been cases in which there is an unforeseen health problem in an officer or senior cabin crewmember, which represents a decrease in the crew that is impossible to cover immediately.

Ecuadorian aeronautical regulations control the operation in cases of early departure or delays in the time of takeoff / landing. Resolution 120/2017 determines the obligation for the airline to notify, with due justification, any change in the time of departure and arrival, applying international processes and standards.

Unscheduled Maintenance:

The airlines comply with an aircraft maintenance schedule, previously approved by the local Aeronautical Authority, who, as the controlling body, will verify compliance. These are called scheduled maintenance. But aircrafts are machines and therefore susceptible to unforeseen damage, which may cause inevitable delays in the operation of a flight. Each technical problem must be documented and recorded in accordance with the protocol established in the manuals of each company; this is done to ensure the safety of passengers, crew and ground personnel.

The airlines that operate in Ecuador have programs, policies and manuals that govern each operational process of their flights. In the case of international airlines, these procedures are subject to a certification process carried out by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation based on the Technical Aviation Regulations, known as RDAC. For international operators it is the RDCAC 129 and for domestic airlines the RDAC 121.

Airlines publish constant and first-hand information in their social networks when events like these happen, and seek to offer the passenger immediate solutions, to the extent possible, so that they arrive safely at their destination.

Finally, for airlines, the security of their operations will always come first. Therefore, when conditions are not safe for a flight, delays and cancellations, even if they are annoying for users, are unavoidable for the benefit of the passengers themselves, crew, and the ground workers.

Verónica Olivo
Associate en CorralRosales
volivo@corralrosales.com

Ecuadorian Intellectual Property office upholds the distinctiveness of the three-dimensional trademark registered by Crocs, INC.

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Through Resolution No. OCDI-2019-0618[1], the Ecuadorian Intellectual Property Office confirmed that the design of CROCS footwear is capable of being recognized by consumers, and also allows consumers to differentiate it from the products of competitors, since it has its own special elements that give the product a different appearance, and is not common or ordinary.

With this decision, the distinctiveness of the three-dimensional design of CROCS footwear in Ecuador was upheld, and it is confirmed that only CROCS, INC. may market goods under such design, having the exclusive right to prevent third parties from using and marketing the same or similar goods.

In 2015, CROCS, INC. obtained the registration of the mark THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3D BAYA SHOE DESIGN) to protect “footwear”.

The three-dimensional mark has its own characteristics, which differentiate it from the traditional denominative, figurative and mixed mark, since with this specific type of marks, an object that occupies a volume in space is protected; that is, it is the shape of a product or its packaging. Therefore, the distinctiveness of this type of marks rests in the shape and relief as a whole, among other distinctive elements that are added into its configuration.

In 2017, JHON ALBERTO FIGUEROA VIVANCO applied to the Ecuadorian Intellectual Property Office for the nullity of the mentioned registration, claiming that it was a generic shape for footwear and therefore not for exclusive appropriation by one entity. Additionally, the claimant pointed out that the design granted a functional or technical advantage to the product, and so could not be protected as a trademark according to the law.

Article 135 of Decision 486 of the Andean Community establishes that the following signs cannot be registered as trademark:

“(…)

  1. those that lack distinctiveness;
  2. those that consist exclusively of usual forms of the products or their packaging, or of shapes or characteristics imposed by the nature or the function of the product or service in question;
  3. those that consist exclusively of a shape or other elements that give a functional or technical advantage to the product or service to which they apply; (…) ”

During the proceedings, CROCS, INC. was able to show that the contested registration did meet the requirements to be considered a three-dimensional design, even filing evidence of registrations obtained over the same design in several other countries, in which, as in Ecuador, the distinctiveness of their unique designs had been recognized.

With regard to the functional advantage claimed by the plaintiff, the IP Office determined that the arbitrary elements of the design are not dictated by function, since the exclusion of such shapes, reliefs, crevices and holes does not prevent the natural use of the product.

Katherine González H.
Associate at CorralRosales
katherine@corralrosales.com


[1] Proceeding No. 17-1679-RV-2S dated 18 July 2019.